Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Solar Energy News  




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















SOLAR DAILY
A record year for Swedish leading solar energy technology provider Midsummer
by Staff Writers
Stockholm, Sweden (SPX) May 18, 2017


File image.

Midsummer has presented a record result for 2016. Revenues nearly doubled and profits increased, due to several new orders for the company's DUO thin film solar cell manufacturing system.

2016 was an eventful and successful year for Midsummer, filled with several new orders for its compact thin film solar cell manufacturing system DUO. In its Annual Report for 2016, the company announces sales revenues of 60 MSEK, up by nearly 100 percent from the previous year, and an annual profit of 10 MSEK. To meet the increased market demand the company hired 15 new employees during the latest year.

"2016 was a record year for us," said Sven Lindstrom, CEO, Midsummer AB. "We did some great business, and the market acceptance for our solar energy technology solutions increased, which resulted in several orders for our compact DUO thin film solar cell manufacturing system. The DUO system is now the most widely spread manufacturing tool for flexible CIGS solar cells in the world."

Midsummer is a leading developer and supplier of advanced solar energy technology solutions for the production and installation of thin film solar panels, and also a leading Swedish growth and export company; Midsummer has several times been named as one of Sweden's and Europe's fastest growing technology companies.

"We have yet again shown that we are the leading provider and supplier of advanced solar energy technology solutions for the production and installation of thin film solar panels. Swedish technology is at the forefront of the race towards a fossil free planet and we look forward to the future, with continued development and increased sales of our solutions in the global market", Sven Lindstrom concludes.

SOLAR DAILY
Next-gen solar cells could be improved by atomic-scale redesign
London, UK (SPX) May 15, 2017
Researchers have uncovered the exact mechanism that causes new solar cells to break down in air, paving the way for a solution. Solar cells harness energy from the Sun and provide an alternative to non-renewable energy sources like fossil fuels. However, they face challenges from costly manufacturing processes and poor efficiency - the amount of sunlight converted to useable energy. ... read more

Related Links
Midsummer
All About Solar Energy at SolarDaily.com

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

SOLAR DAILY
Triple play boosting value of renewable fuel could tip market in favor of biomass

Insight into enzyme's 3-D structure could cut biofuel costs

Microbial fuel cell converts methane to electricity

A full life cycle assessment of second-generation biofuels

SOLAR DAILY
GE Appliances to get Google voice control option

Live interactions with robots increase their perceived human likeness

3-D-printed 'bionic skin' could give robots the sense of touch

Robotic 'exoskeleton' prevents elderly falls: study

SOLAR DAILY
Scientists track porpoises to assess impact of offshore wind farms

Dutch open 'world's largest offshore' wind farm

OX2 will manage a 45 MW wind farm owned by IKEA Group in Lithuania

Building Energy celebrates the beginning of operations and electricity generation of its first wind farm

SOLAR DAILY
Singapore car 'vending machine' dispenses with tradition

GM announces drive for sustainable rubber

Judge curbs Uber engineer in trade secrets case

Volvo says may pull brake on diesel engines

SOLAR DAILY
Advancing next-generation Stable, safe, smart, sustainable batteries

Photocatalyst makes hydrogen production 10 times more efficient

Physicists discover that lithium oxide on tokamak walls can improve plasma performance

Laser pulses reveal the superconductors of the future

SOLAR DAILY
Swiss vote for gradual nuclear phaseout, energy makeover

Hungary: AREVA NP awarded contract for safety IC modernization at Paks Nuclear Power Plant

India to build 10 domestic nuclear power reactors

Japan restarts another reactor

SOLAR DAILY
Australia power grid leased to local-foreign consortium

Poland central to EU energy diversification strategy

Myanmar recovery linked to development of electrical grid

U.S. emissions generally lower last year

SOLAR DAILY
The superhighway threatening Nigeria's tropical rainforest

Greenpeace says Canadian forestry lawsuit aims to silence critics

Study refutes findings behind challenge to Sierra Nevada forest restoration

Microscopic soil creatures could orchestrate massive tree migrations




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement