Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Solar Energy News  




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















SOLAR DAILY
More solar power thanks to titanium
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Aug 28, 2017


"The titanium dioxide interlayer was considered to act as a titanium cation source to dope hematite," they argued. Doping here means to increase the charge-carrier density in the photocatalyst by bringing in more positive centers and boost the electrical conductivity.

Earth-abundant, cheap metals are promising photocatalytic electrode materials in artificial photosynthesis. A team of Chinese scientists now reports that a thin layer of titania beneath hematite nanorods can boost the performance of the photoanode. As outlined in their report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the nanostructured electrode benefits from two separate effects. This design combining nanostructure with chemical doping may be exemplary for improved "green" photocatalytic systems.

With the help of a catalyst, sunlight can drive the oxidation of water to oxygen and the release of electrons for current generation, a process also called artificial photosynthesis. Iron oxide in the form of hematite is a convenient and cheap catalyst candidate, but the electrons set free by the chemical reaction tend to be trapped again and get lost; the electricity flow is inefficient.

As a solution, Jinlong Gong from Tianjin University, China, introduced a nanometer-thin passivation layer of titania. Not only does this prevent charge recombination between the hematite electrode structure and the substrate, but it also provides the iron oxide with a considerable doping source to increase its charge-carrier density, a highly promising effect for photoelectric applications.

Hematite may be an abundant material (iron ore), but despite its photocatalytic advantages like photostability and good energetic preconditions, scientists still struggle with its sluggish kinetics and poor electrical conductivity. Nanostructured hematite may be one solution.

The hematite photocatalysts are grown on conductive glass substrates in nanorod arrays, which are further furnished with branchlets to obtain a bushy, dendritic shape. This branched nanorod structure greatly enlarges the surface to promote the water-oxidation reaction, but the problem of charge recombination, especially at the hematite-substrate interface, is not solved.

Therefore, Gong and his colleagues grew dendritic hematite nanorods on an interlayer of titanium dioxide, which by itself is a photoactive material. If sufficiently thin, the coated structure can both prevent charge recombination and provide conductivity, but this was not the only intention the scientists had.

"The titanium dioxide interlayer was considered to act as a titanium cation source to dope hematite," they argued. Doping here means to increase the charge-carrier density in the photocatalyst by bringing in more positive centers and boost the electrical conductivity.

Both effects, passivation and doping, indeed produced a more than four times higher photocurrent under standardized conditions. The addition of an iron hydroxide co-catalyst pushed the photocurrent density even further to a value more than five times above that of the undoped system. This design combining cheap materials, few preparation steps, and enhanced electrical performance may be exemplary for improved systems in green artificial photosynthesis.

Research paper

SOLAR DAILY
Coronal Energy completes major solar installations on Department Of Defense property
Pensacola, FL (SPX) Aug 23, 2017
Coronal Energy, powered by Panasonic, a leading independent power producer (IPP) and provider of turnkey renewable energy solutions, and Pensacola-headquartered energy provider Gulf Power have completed the largest combined portfolio of solar facilites on Department of Defense property to date. The 120 MWac Gulf Coast Solar Center spans 942 acres across three Navy and Air Force sites in No ... read more

Related Links
Wiley
All About Solar Energy at SolarDaily.com

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

SOLAR DAILY
Cyborg bacteria outperform plants when turning sunlight into useful compounds

Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat to power wearable devices

How a bacterium can live on methanol

Potato waste processing may be the road to enhanced food waste conversion

SOLAR DAILY
AI revolution will be all about humans, says Siri trailblazer

DARPA assured autonomy seeks to guarantee safety of learning-enabled autonomous systems

Northrop Grumman to demonstrate autonomous networked unmanned vehicles

SSL and NASA complete preliminary design review for on-orbit robotic servicing spacecraft

SOLAR DAILY
First foundations set for Baltic Sea wind farm

Wind energy blows up storm of controversy in Mexico

U.S. extends wind energy taproots into Zambia

Night vision for bird- and bat-friendly offshore wind power

SOLAR DAILY
Merkel wants to 'restore trust' in diesel after scandal

Great Wall shares slide as Fiat Chrysler hopes dampened

China's Great Wall Motor plans Fiat Chrysler purchase

Uber's ousted CEO calls investor lawsuit unfounded

SOLAR DAILY
Scientists make breakthrough in magnesium batteries

ULEMCo plans a fuel cell approach to extend range of electric vans

A quick and easy way to shut down instabilities in fusion devices

IV and cellular fluids power flexible batteries

SOLAR DAILY
Fukushima operator faces $5 bn US suit over 2011 disaster

UAE nuclear programme edges toward 2018 launch

129I waste used to track ocean currents for 15,000 km after discharge from nuclear plants

Analysis highlights failings in US's advanced nuclear program

SOLAR DAILY
India must rethink infrastructure needs for 100 new 'smart' cities to be sustainable

Allowable 'carbon budget' most likely overestimated

Sparkling springs aid quest for underground heat energy sources

Google's 'moonshot' factory spins off geothermal unit

SOLAR DAILY
Tropical trees maintain high carbon accumulation rates into old age

Storms felled record number of trees in Poland: officials

Brazilian tribes celebrate court ruling on land rights

Drought-affected trees die from hydraulic failure and carbon starvation




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement