Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Solar Energy News  




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















SOLAR DAILY
Renewables can't deliver Paris climate goals: study
By Marlowe HOOD
Paris (AFP) Jan 30, 2017


Expansion of renewable energy cannot by itself stave off catastrophic climate change, scientists warned Monday.

Even if solar and wind capacity continues to grow at breakneck speed, it will not be fast enough to cap global warming under two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), the target set down in the landmark 2015 Paris climate treaty, they reported in the journal Nature Climate Change.

"The rapid deployment of wind, solar and electric cars gives some hope," lead author Glen Peters, a researcher at the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research in Oslo, Norway, told AFP.

"But at this stage, these technologies are not really displacing the growth in fossil fuels or conventional transportation."

Earth is overheating mainly due to the burning of oil, gas and especially coal to power the global economy.

Barely 1C (1.8F) of warming so far has already led to deadly heatwaves, drought and superstorms engorged by rising seas.

The 196-nation Paris Agreement set a collective goal to cap warming, but lacks the tools to track progress, especially at the country level.

To provide a better toolkit, Peters and colleagues broke down the energy system into half-a-dozen indicators -- GDP growth, energy used per unit of GDP, CO2 emissions per unit of energy, share of fossil fuels in the energy mix, etc.

What emerged was a sobering picture of narrowing options.

- Barely a dent -

"Wind and solar alone are not sufficient to meet the goals," Peters said.

The bottom line, the study suggests, is how much carbon pollution seeps into the atmosphere, and on that score renewable have -- so far -- barely made a dent.

Investment in solar and wind has soared, outstripping fossil fuels for the first time last year. And renewables' share of global energy consumption has increased five-fold since 2000.

But it still only accounts for less than three percent of the total.

Moreover, the share of fossil fuels -- nearly 87 percent -- has not budged due to a retreat in nuclear power over the same 15-year period.

Even a renewables Marshall Plan would face an unyielding deadline: To stay under 2C, the global economy must be carbon neutral -- producing no more CO2 than can be absorbed by oceans and forests -- by mid-century.

Compounding the challenge, other key policies and technologies deemed essential for holding down temperatures remain woefully underdeveloped, the study cautioned.

In particular, the capacity to keep or pull carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and store it securely -- a cornerstone of end-of-century projections for a climate-safe world -- is practically non-existent.

Vetted by the UN's top climate science panel, these scenarios presume that thousands of industrial-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) facilities will be up-and-running by 2030.

As of today, there are only one or two, with a couple of dozen in various stages of construction.

- Negative emissions -

Another form of clean energy pencilled into most medium- and long-term forecasts that does not yet exist on any meaningful scale is carbon-neutral biofuels.

The idea is that CO2 captured while plants grow will compensate for greenhouse gases released when they are burned for energy.

On paper, that carbon pollution will also be captured and stored, resulting in "negative emissions" -- a net reduction of CO2 in the atmosphere.

But here again, reality is dragging its feet.

"It is uncertain whether bioenergy can be sustainably produced and made carbon-neutral at the scale required," the researchers noted.

All of these technologies must come on line if we are to have a fighting chance of keeping a lid of global warming, which is currently on track to heat the planet by 3C to 4C (5.4F to 7.2F), the study concluded.

Market momentum alone is not enough, Peters added.

"There need to be a shift in focus," he said in an email exchange.

"Politician seem happy to support wind, solar and electric vehicles through subsidies. But they are not willing to put prices" -- a carbon tax, for example -- "on fossil fuels."

"Unless the emissions from fossil fuels goes down, the 2C target is an impossibility."

In an informal survey last week of top climate scientists, virtually all of them said that goal is probably already out of reach.


Comment on this article using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue source from good quality advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames, passwords and payment processes.

Our news coverage takes time and money to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites helpful then please consider becoming a regular supporter of just make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only


.


Related Links
All About Solar Energy at SolarDaily.com






Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
SOLAR DAILY
Saudi Arabia takes low-carbon energy approach
Paris (UPI) Jan 30, 2017
French energy company ENGIE said it was making progress on its efforts to advance its low carbon portfolio with a new contract in Saudi Arabia. The French energy company said it was awarded a contract to help build a gas-power plant in Saudi Arabia. With the contract, ENGIE said it was taking a lead position as a power producer in the Middle East. "The Fadhili project is in line ... read more


SOLAR DAILY
DuPont Industrial Biosciences to develop new high-efficiency biogas enzyme method

Cathay Pacific to cut emissions with switch to biofuel

Populus dataset holds promise for biofuels, materials, metabolites

Handheld Sensor Unit Determines Biofuel Content Of Diesel Blends

SOLAR DAILY
New wave of robots set to deliver the goods

MIT's wearable AI system can detect a conversation's tone

Over to you, automation

Making AI systems that see the world as humans do

SOLAR DAILY
Prysmian UK to supply land cable connections for East Anglia ONE offshore wind farm

Russia's nuclear giant pushes into wind energy

The power of wind energy and how to use it

Largest US offshore wind farm gets green light

SOLAR DAILY
Chinese, Mexican automakers team up to make SUVs

Daimler to supply self-driving cars for Uber

Dieselgate drags on for VW and Bosch with new payouts

German prosecutors say probing former VW CEO for fraud

SOLAR DAILY
GM, Honda annouce fuel cell venture in Michigan

Researchers flip script for Li-Ion electrolytes to simulate better batteries

Former OPEC member Indonesia makes geothermal move

UNIST researchers get green light to commercialize metal-air batteries

SOLAR DAILY
Toshiba to stop building new nuclear plants: report

International partnerships vital for UK nuclear energy

Canada uranium supplier, Fukushima operator in contract fight

Russia 'ready' to entirely fund Hungary nuclear plant

SOLAR DAILY
Nordic countries are bringing about an energy transition worth copying

Iraq inks billion-dollar power plant deal with GE

China energy firm expands in crisis-hit Brazil

Europe to take up climate investment mantle

SOLAR DAILY
High-tech maps of tropical forest diversity identify new conservation targets

Risk of tree species disappearing in central Africa 'a major concern,' say researchers

Forests 'held their breath' during global warming hiatus, research shows

Trees supplement income for rural farmers in Africa




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement