Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Solar Energy News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



SOLAR DAILY
UNIST researchers develop highly stable perovskite solar cells
by Staff Writers
Ulsan, South Korea (SPX) Oct 26, 2017


Highly-stable perovskite solar cells, developed by Professor Jin Young Kim's team.

A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has presented a highly stable perovskite solar cells (PSCs), using edged-selectively fluorine (F) functionalized graphene nano-platelets (EFGnPs). This breakthrough has gotten much attention as it is made out of fluorine, a low-cost alternative to gold.

A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has presented a highly stable perovskite solar cells (PSCs), using edged-selectively fluorine (F) functionalized graphene nano-platelets (EFGnPs). This breakthrough has gotten much attention as it is made out of fluorine, a low-cost alternative to gold.

This study has been jointly led by Professor Jin Young Kim in the School of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST in collaboration with Dong Suk Kim of Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER). Assistant Professor Gi-Hwan Kim in the School of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST partook in this study, as the lead author. The findings of the study has been published in the September issue of the prestigious journal, Nano Letters.

Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have attracted more attention in the past few years, as the next-generation solar cells with the potential to surpass silicon cells' efficiency. Nevertheless, stability and cost issues in PSCs seem to block further advancements toward commercialization.

The perovskite materials are easily decomposed in moisture conditions. They cannot survive even for one day without proper encapsulation and this results in low stability.

To solve these issues and make progress toward the commercialization of PSCs, Professor Kim and his team introduced a highly stable p-i-n structure for PSCs using fluorine functionalized EFGnPs to fully cover the perovskite active layer and protect against the ingress of water for high-stability PSCs.

"Fluorocarbons, such as polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) are well-known for their superhydrophobic properties and comprise carbon fluorine (C-F) bonding," says Professor Gwi-Hwan Kim at UNIST. "By substituting carbon for fluorine, we have created a two-dimensional material with high hydrophobicity, like Teflon. Then, applied it to PSCs. "

"This study overcame weakness of perovskite solar cells that have high efficiencies but low stability," says Professor Jin Young Kim. "This breakthrough holds substantial promise as the base technology for the application of the next-generation solar cells, as well as various IoT devices and displays," says Professor Jin Young Kim.

The newly-developed perovskite solar cell device was fabricated using solution processes, a process that involves the coating perovskite materials on a flexible film. Using this process allows the future application of solar cells to wearable devices.

The next-generation solar cells are advantageous in that they have a simple manufacturing process and a low manufacturing cost, compared the existing silicon-based inorganic electronic devices.

Gi-Hwan Kim, et al., "Fluorine Functionalized Graphene Nano Platelets for Highly Stable Inverted Perovskite Solar Cells," Nano Letters, (2017).

SOLAR DAILY
Air pollution cuts solar energy potential in China
Princeton NJ (SPX) Oct 26, 2017
China is rapidly expanding its solar power supply, hoping to meet 10 percent of the nation's electricity needs with solar energy by 2030. But there's a problem: severe air pollution is blocking light from the sun, significantly reducing China's output of solar energy, particularly in the northern and eastern parts of the country. This issue is worst in the winter, when - according to resea ... read more

Related Links
Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology
All About Solar Energy at SolarDaily.com


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

SOLAR DAILY
Expanding Brazilian sugarcane could dent global CO2 emissions

Stiff fibers spun from slime

Converting carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide using water, electricity

Separating methane and CO2 will become more efficient

SOLAR DAILY
Liquid metal brings soft robotics a step closer

Samsung's revamped Bixby takes on Amazon Alexa

Emma the robot masseuse gets to work in Singapore

US spacewalkers repair aging ISS robotic arm

SOLAR DAILY
Construction to begin on $160 million Industry Leading Hybrid Renewable Energy Project

A kite that might fly

Scotland outreach to Canada yields wind energy investment

First floating wind farm starts operation in Scotland

SOLAR DAILY
Delphi boosts self-driving efforts with $400 mn deal for nuTonomy

Study: Millions of miles of planned roads shouldn't be built

Singapore to freeze number of cars on its roads

Oklahoma frustrated by ruling against alternative vehicle fees

SOLAR DAILY
Electronic entropy enhances water splitting

Scientists solve a magnesium mystery in rechargeable battery performance

Ames UConn team discover superconductor with bounce

PPPL takes detailed look at 2-D structure of turbulence in tokamaks

SOLAR DAILY
MATRIX pitched as a game changer for used fuel dry storage

South Korea to push ahead with nuclear power plants

AREVA NP awarded contract for safety upgrades in seven reactors

AREVA NP installs a system allowing flexible electricity generation at Goesgen nuclear power plant

SOLAR DAILY
Japan faces challenges in cutting CO2, Moody's finds

IEA: An electrified world would cost $31B per year to achieve

'Fuel-secure' steps in Washington counterintuitive, green group says

SLAC-led project will use AI to prevent or minimize electric grid failures

SOLAR DAILY
Tropical tree roots represent an underappreciated carbon pool

Conservation cutbacks put Brazil's Amazon animals at risk

More trees, better farming could slash carbon emissions: study

Carbon feedback from forest soils will accelerate global warming




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement