Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Solar Energy News .




SOLAR DAILY
Juwi Pushes Forward Thai Energy Transition with Large-Scale Solar
by Staff Writers
Munich, Germany (SPX) Jan 28, 2013


illustration only

The German juwi group pushes forward the Thai energy transition: The company is constructing five free-field photovoltaic plants in two provinces in Northwestern and Eastern Thailand, in Kamphaeng Phet and in Ubon Ratchathani.

The solar parks have a capacity of 48 MW. The contract between juwi and the Investor Soleq Solar Thailand Co. Ltd. was signed on 14th of December, first construction work has already started. In order to protect the sites from extraordinary floods like in 2011 the plants will be equipped with comprehensive flood protection systems.

The frequency and intensity of these extraordinary weather events increases due to climate change and need to be considered when planning solar farms.

"Climate change presents us with special challenges. Therefore the specialist for renewable energies, its Thai construction partner and the Investor conducted and analyzed hydrological studies for each location to implement protection also for extraordinary weather events.

"The solar farms are equipped with trenches, dykes, water retention basins and pumping stations. Dykes protect the system from external flooding. If it rains heavily and water accumulates in the area of the solar parks, the water will be drained by the installed pumping systems.

"The solar power systems will be able to cope with all kinds of weather conditions," says Amiram Roth-Deblon, Regional Director Asia Pacific of juwi. juwi will also be responsible for the solar park's operational management.

Construction work strengthens Thai businesses: The project directly creates jobs for more than 1,000 people during engineering and construction and operational jobs for the entire lifetime of more than 20 years. The solar farms will have a total module area of 314,667 square meters and will produce 70,400,000 kilowatt hours of clean energy annually.

This will provide clean electricity for more than 30 000 Thai households and saves 37,000 tons of climate-damaging CO2 annually. The solar power plants are scheduled to be connected to the grid between July to September 2013.

The produced power will be fed into the local grid. "Thailand has proven to be dedicated to renewable energies and is therefore an interesting market. We invest in Thailand for the long-term and plan to support the Kingdom in its effort to become independent from fossil fuels," says Amiram Roth-Deblon.

More good news for the climate comes from India. Together with its business partner Green Infra Limited juwi completed two solar power systems in Rajasthan with a total capacity of 26 MW, of which 17 MW have already been connected to the grid. The solar park is situated on a former converted military site and has a projected annual energy yield of 46,500,000 kilowatt hours. It saves 12,000 tons of climate-damaging CO2 annually.

"India has become one of the most promising solar markets in the world today. Green Infra and juwi India together look to play a key role in developing India's solar market and in connecting larger plants to the grid in the coming years;" say Shiv Nimbargi, Managing Director and CEO Green Infra, and Rajeshwara Bhat, Managing Director juwi India.

"With the projects in Thailand and India juwi is strengthening its activities in Asia Pacific and is actively contributing to the energy turnaround in the region.

.


Related Links
juwi group
All About Solar Energy at SolarDaily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





SOLAR DAILY
'Evolution' improves solar cell efficiency
Evanston, Ill. (UPI) Jan 25, 2013
U.S. researchers say they've developed a new design for organic solar cells that could lead to more efficient, less expensive solar power. Using a mathematical algorithm based on natural evolution, researchers at Northwestern University identified a specific optimal geometrical pattern for capturing and holding light in thin-cell organic solar cells, a university release reported Friday ... read more


SOLAR DAILY
Wind in the willows boosts biofuel production

Fuel Choices and How They Affect Car Insurance

US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack visits Renmatix for commissioning of plant to sugar BioFlex Conversion Unit

Photovoltaics beat biofuels at converting sun's energy to miles driven

SOLAR DAILY
Robofish Grace glides with the greatest of ease

Nexter joins robot development business

Game on: European student codes reach ISS

Robot Spheres in zero-gravity action

SOLAR DAILY
Japan plans world's largest wind farm

China revs up wind power amid challenges

Algonquin Power Buys 109 MW Shady Oaks Wind Power Facility

British group pans wind farm compensation

SOLAR DAILY
Toyota, Nissan announce record sales for 2012

Caterpillar's China woes warn foreign investors

New car mirror avoids 'blind spot'

Volvo set to be world leader in heavy trucks after China merger

SOLAR DAILY
Iraq inks oil exploration deal with Kuwait Energy

Baghdad repeats Exxon ultimatum: Kurdistan or south Iraq

Lebanon's feuds 'could spark gas conflict'

Aquino alleges China harassed Philippines boats

SOLAR DAILY
French government backs ex-Areva boss to head EADS: report

Bulgaria nuclear referendum set to fail

Bulgarian nuclear referendum on track to fail

France names ex-Areva boss to EADS board

SOLAR DAILY
Latest Ways to Make Your Business Energy Efficient

China coal plant shut by health chiefs

Keeping the lights on with renewables

Czech PM slams Albania grid decision

SOLAR DAILY
Brazil to inventory Amazon rainforest trees

Civilians fell rare Syrian trees for firewood

Prosecutors take issue with Brazil's new forestry code

Climate change's effects on temperate rain forests surprisingly complex




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement